Primer Topic Levels

[2015-07-17 Fri 10:48] Since studyhall is designed to be a series of self-directed study programs that are part of a larger lifetime-learning plan, traditional course material is not adequate. Topics will be revisited at different times of a person's life with different needs. So what is needed is a flexible means of covering topics that can be approached at different times in different contexts.

In this way material can then be woven into hierarchical trees, or sequential narratives that can meet the needs of a specific course of study. So there will be no one way of accessing and using the material

Primer topics, like man page titles include numbers in parenthesis, eg. more(1), that indicates what level of complexity/abstraction that the topic is covered:

  • 0. Definition: dictionary/micropeadia style definitions, pronunciation, etymology & duck tests.
  • 1. Introduction: basics, assumes no previous knowledge.
  • 2. Common: most common usage for average day-to-day use.
  • 3. Power: advanced day-to-day usage.
  • 4. Manual: complete documentation including little used, or known edge-case options and usage.
  • 5. Cookbook: use cases & example commands and/or code.
  • 6. HowTo: sequential proscriptive instructions.
  • 7. Context: the history and larger context surrounding the topic.
  • 8. Timeline: sequential or branching event time line
  • 9. Reference: annotated links to local and external material, both online and analog media.

Topics might any one or all levels. For example, there are Editor Wars(7), Editor Wars(8) and Editor Wars(9). But no entries for 1-6.

Levels 1-4 are built on top of each other, each containing the contents of the level below it. Level 2 is an expansion of level 1, level 3 is an expansion of level 2 and level floor expands to include anything not included in the other levels.

This approach is designed so that beginners are not overwhelmed by too much detail, and experienced users who need to find common usage or options can find it quickly without plodding through too much material. And when fully expanded to level 4, can be used as comprehensive cannonical documentation within the Scopic Primer, which will always point to normative external references in the level 9 Reference level.